Steve Bronstein


Steve Bronstein

Vermont

There is something wonderful about shaping a hot piece of metal. You hit it with a hammer and it moves. As if working a piece of clay, the hot iron is molded into shape. You have to move fast. When the metal is hot you don't stop to think - there is time for that
when the metal has cooled. After tile iron is heated up, it is time to act.
The energy of working at the forge fits me very well. I had my first experience forging at a weekend workshop, given by a local blacksmith. That was almost 30 years ago.I am still excited about my work, and what I may discover working at the anvil and forge.

Care of your Ironwork

This piece is made of forged iron. The finish is a 60/40 mixture of linseed oil and turpentine. To preserve the finish it is advised to occasionally recoat with any kind of furniture polish, floor wax, or more of the original mixture. If ever any oxidation (rusting) is observed then one might put some wax or oil on an abrasive pad (like you use on teflon cookware) and lightly rub the affected area. If a more weatherproof finished is desired, it will be necessary to paint the piece with an outdoor spray enamel such as Rustoleum Hammered Metal Finish Spray Paint. All of our work is guaranteed; if there is ever a question or a problem, please do not hesitate to call.We hope you enjoy our work for many years to come.